The Real Foodie

Tag: raw milk

El Galpón, Buenos Aires

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My second real food stop in Buenos Aires was El Galpón farmers’ market in Chacarita, which I was more impressed with during this trip than Sabe La Tierra in San Fernando. Here I was finally able to find raw grass-fed milk and yoghurt! They came in glass bottles and I found them at La Azucena stall, owned by Walter and his father Nestor. They only bring two bottles of raw milk to the market each time for the few customers who buy it so I got lucky. Usually you have to call in advance and order it. The milk was much creamier than our Amish grass-fed raw milk in the U.S. and had a richer flavour.

Walter explained to me that the milk would need to be boiled after two days, which I found strange because our Amish milk lasts at least a week. I thought he was being overly cautious as most people are afraid of raw milk but sure enough it did start to sour after two days. However, it didn’t sour in the same way as our raw milk sours which usually gets a bitter taste and curdles, it became thick and developed a pleasant tart flavour like buttermilk. As time went on the flavour stayed the same and the milk got thicker. I did not need to pasteurise it as it comes from roaming grass-fed cows, eating what they are designed to eat and therefore not sick like grain-fed, confined cows. The fact that it had such a pleasant taste meant it was free from any harmful bacteria. If milk has bad bacteria it smells foul, such as when pasteurised milk goes bad, it doesn’t sour like raw milk, because all the enzymes which would otherwise ferment the milk and turn it sour, producing more beneficial bacteria, have been destroyed by the heat process of pasteurisation.

At La Azucena they sell cow milk, goat milk, cow yoghurt, goat yoghurt, aged and soft cheeses as well as chicken, chicken eggs, quails eggs, salami without preservatives, pork, bacon, sausages, pollen and honey. The cheeses unfortunately are not raw. Their farm is in Las Heras; their cows are purely grass-fed and their chickens are pastured and also given leftovers from the vegetable garden and some non-organic corn (which could mean it is GMO). I went back to the market the following week and bought more raw milk, as well as salami and cheese. The milk again soured after two days which was problematic considering my daughter refused to drink it after it soured and I was not able to go to the market again until 2 days later, but it was still delicious and a breakthrough to have finally found a source for raw milk in Buenos Aires.

At the Granja Organica de Arroyo del Medio stand they sell organic pastured eggs, salamis made without preservatives using pastured meats and homemade mustard, pesto, hummus, and eggplant pate. Territorio Cuyano sells organic wines.

At Grupo San Juan there is a wide array of organic vegetables: mostly greens, some fruits and local blueberries. La Choza, which is also at Sabe La Tierra market, sells organic pasteurised, grass-fed milk, yoghurt and cheese. Cumulen stand sells ice creams made from grass-fed milk, carefully sculpted in the Argentine tradition onto cones, which come in a variety of different natural fruit flavours.

There is a very good cafe at El Galpón where they serve organic salads, pastured grilled meats, whole grain alternatives to the classic Argentine pastries such as empanadas and tartas as well as whole wheat pizzas and pastas (my favourite being beet ravioli when in season), all from local farms. They have fresh organic juices such as passionfruit, peach, blueberry and mulberry.

El Galpón is held every Wednesday and Saturday next to the Federico Lacroze train station in Chacarita.

 

Farm Delivery

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Today my delivery arrived in Southampton from my farm buying club in Miami! (which actually comes from an Amish farm in Pennsylvania—for legal reasons to do with raw dairy I can’t mention the name.) I can’t believe that I suffered for the last two years since I left New York and ended my farm buying club membership here; every time I would visit my family in Southampton for holidays and and during the summers when I would stay for several weeks, I would be stuck without any raw yoghurt or kefir. I used to drive for miles to a local farm in Bridgehampton every other day to stock up on pastured eggs, meat and raw milk and would have to make my own kefir and yoghurt from the raw milk, which never turned out well. After the entire summer last summer of feeding Olivia the raw milk, yoghurt and kefir from the farm (I can’t mention any names) I found out that the cows, which I thought were 100 percent grass fed, were being fed GMO soy while they were milked twice a day! (I got suspicious one time after I saw soy beans scattered on the floor of the barn and asked.) So this summer I was researching other farms to buy raw milk, the closest being in Riverhead (which isn‘t close) but when I called the farm they didn’t answer. Then my friend who is also a member of the Miami club told me she orders directly from the farm by mail when she spends her summers in Westhampton. I never knew I could order directly from the farm and receive the refrigerated package the next day by mail, still cold! What a difference this will make to my summer! I will still go to my local farm stands for fruits and vegetables (even the one in Bridgehampton which sell many other good things) and support the local food here but at least I won’t have to worry about where to find raw milk and it will save me a lot of driving.